Apps and the push for Subscriptions

Apps and the push for Subscriptions

I needed a new business suit so off to the shops I went.

It took an hour to try different styles until I found the right one. Once decided, I took the suit to the cash desk with bank card ready.

“That’ll be £200 Sir,” said the store manager, “and £10 per month.”

“Why £10 a month?” I asked.

“Well Sir, although we make money on the original sale, we need a regular income from our customers, like Netflix”.

I don’t mind paying extra for alterations or occasional dry cleaning, but not to wear the suit after I paid.

I'm not quite sure how I feel about individual app subscriptions yet but this is a take worth reading. Perhaps that's why something like Setapp is slightly ahead of the curve...you basically have one subscription but for a whole suite of apps.

Like most things, the market will figure itself out.

The Subscription App Paradox – Hacker Noon

Ulysses Workflow

Ulysses Workflow

Over the past few months as we’ve been working on our new course, Learn Ulysses, I’ve learned a lot about the Ulysses app itself. And most of what I’ve learned has come from seeing how other people use the app.

This is a great little video. You can watch the video at his site or try out Ulysses for free here.

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iOS 11

iOS 11

Despite a decade in the wild, in many ways iOS is still a young operating system. It's good to see Apple not resting on its laurels, but instead continuing to reevaluate and redesign the areas of the OS that need it — such as iPad productivity features and the App Store. The ground-breaking potential for iPad users in iOS 11 shows just how much that aspect of the system has been neglected, but many of the other changes show how Apple's slow refinements over years are paying off.

iOS 11: The MacStories Overview

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My Thanks to MacPaw

My Thanks to MacPaw

My thanks to MacPaw for reaching out to me to be a part of their SetApp affiliate program. If you have a website similar to mine (or even more mac/tech specific) I would recommend checking it out.

After checking out SetApp, I already see a bunch of applications that I have paid full price for in the past - Ulysses, 2Do, TaskPaper, and more. I could have paid for SetApp for about 2 years and then some, for all the money I spent out of the box with these apps...and I've paid for the individual app upgrades.

All that to say, SetApp is a pretty nice service if you're looking to get in to some quality Mac apps.

Check out some of the included apps here.

Coffee Drinkers Really Do Live Longer

Coffee Drinkers Really Do Live Longer

By now, it's clear: There’s a strong case for the health benefits of coffee. Studies have recently shown that regular java drinkers have a lower risk of diabetes, fewer strokes and heart problems and lower rates of certain cancers. All of that may help explain why coffee drinkers also tend to live longer than people who don't drink the brew.

Boom baby.

Coffee Drinkers Really Do Live Longer

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Quiz Helps You Decide Which National Park You Should Visit Next

Quiz Helps You Decide Which National Park You Should Visit Next

The NPCA, which is an organization dedicated to protecting and enhancing the National Park System, has published a fun quiz designed to help you figure out which park you should go to next. The quiz starts by asking readers what type of environment they are most attracted to, with options including mountains, forests, beaches and more. From there, it branches out to even more questions that help narrow down the options to the perfect national park for you based on the answers provided.

Looks like I should head to City of Rocks National Reserve, Idaho.

New Quiz Helps You Decide Which National Park You Should Visit Next

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Silent Song Climbs iTunes Charts

Silent Song Climbs iTunes Charts

Nathan Ingraham at Engadget:

If you’ve ever plugged your phone into your car stereo, only to have the same song start playing every single time, I have some good news for you. Yesterday, a true internet hero named Samir Rezhami released a song on iTunes that’s just 10 minutes of silence — and he named it “A a a a a Very Good Song.” Since the iPhone starts playing music alphabetically when you plug it in to many car stereos, that usually means there’s one song that you hear whether you want to or not. Many songs starting with the letter A have probably been ruined thanks to this quirk — but if you download Rezhami’s creation, you’ll instead have plenty of time to queue up the songs you want to hear.

Yes!

A Silent, 10-minute Song is Climbing the iTunes Charts – 512 Pixels

7 Ulysses Superpowers

7 Ulysses Superpowers

The more you use Ulysses, the better it gets.

Yup...that's why I now pay the annual subscription.

While there are other apps that may do one or two things better than Ulysses, I haven’t come across an app that does all Ulysses does with the same amount of ease and delight.

Seven Ulysses Superpowers – The Sweet Setup

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Have Smartphones Detroyed a Generation?

Have Smartphones Detroyed a Generation?

I’ve been researching generational differences for 25 years, starting when I was a 22-year-old doctoral student in psychology. Typically, the characteristics that come to define a generation appear gradually, and along a continuum. Beliefs and behaviors that were already rising simply continue to do so. Millennials, for instance, are a highly individualistic generation, but individualism had been increasing since the Baby Boomers turned on, tuned in, and dropped out. I had grown accustomed to line graphs of trends that looked like modest hills and valleys. Then I began studying Athena’s generation.

This isn't my normal topic I cover but since I have kids that are growing up in the modern era it was good for me to read. Well done, well researched, and credible. If you have kids this is something you should read.

Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?

Did Airbnb Kill the Mountain Town?

Did Airbnb Kill the Mountain Town?

Very interesting look at the unintended consequences of short term rentals - STRs as the author calls them - like Airbnb.

I stay in Airbnbs and the like for the same reasons you do. Because I have a family and I want to cook and have multiple rooms. ­Because I have bikes or other equipment and don’t want to be hassled by the front desk. Because I indeed want to “live like a local” in a quiet, quaint neighborhood. STRs have become so familiar that they already come with their own rituals and clichés, their own weird sense of déjà vu. There’s the three-ring binder stuffed with brochures, the tips from the host, the Wi-Fi password. The odd box of pasta and random condiments. The signs that speak to the failures of previous guests. (In mine: “Please only use the remote to turn the fireplace on or off.”)

From 19th century miners to 20th-­century skiers, people have long sought a temporary abode in mountain towns. The difference now is how we’re finding them. “The stat I cite is that in 2010, 8 percent of leisure travelers used STRs,” says Matt Kies­sling, with the Travel Technology Associ­ation (funded by Airbnb, HomeAway, and Trip­ Advisor). “By the end of 2016, that was projected to be one in three.”

For ski towns throughout the West, perhaps the most pressing challenge related to STRs is workforce housing. “It’s always an issue, and this has just exacerbated it,” Bowes says. “Homes that used to be rented to the workforce, that offered year leases, are suddenly being pulled out from under them and put on the short-term market.”

Never thought that STRs would have that kind of effect, but it makes sense.

Did Airbnb Kill the Mountain Town?

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The 10.5” iPad Pro- Future-Proof

The 10.5” iPad Pro- Future-Proof

A good way to think about the iPad’s new display with ProMotion is not the difference between low-res and Retina screens, but the jump from 30fps to 60fps. You see more of every animation. Text is more legible when you scroll and doesn’t judder. It’s hard to explain and it has to be seen and experienced to be fully understood. Every scroll, page transition, and app launch animation on the 10.5” iPad Pro is absurdly smooth to the point of feeling unrealistic at first – hence the common reaction that something doesn’t quite compute. But as you spend some time with the new iPad and start using it on a daily basis, its display becomes normal and you wish that other Apple displays were the same.

I’m not sure if I’ll end up using multiple iPads in the near future, but I know this: the 10.5” iPad Pro is the nicest, most powerful iPad I’ve used to date.

Federico Viticci is THE iPad expert....so the 10.5 inch is nice but not a full replacement for his 12.9 inch one....yet.

The 10.5” iPad Pro: Future-Proof

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Family Values- Raising Kids Who Love to Climb

Family Values- Raising Kids Who Love to Climb

Quality family time, self-confidence, and a well-rounded perspective on life are just a few of the perks of living the climbing lifestyle together as a family. We have built this type of life very much on purpose; it’s a life that can hopefully show them the value of experience and togetherness over a nice car, a big house, and other material things that our culture tends to prioritize. The climbing life is a doorway to a more fulfilling existence, and now that Mayah, 18, and Will, 16, are becoming adults and following their own paths, I feel more convinced than ever that we made the right decision.

Pro climber and schoolteacher Rob Pizem and his wife, Jane, are raising two young boys in Grand Junction, Colorado, and they have a few rules to make sure the kids are the priority when they go climbing. “By setting parameters, it helps you, the climber, stay out of the way of you, the parent,” Pizem says.

  • It is supposed to be fun, meaning if the kids want to swing from 10 feet up all day, that’s what we do.
  • Climbing with the kids means I might not even climb that day other than hanging ropes for them.
  • The goal is to let them choose to climb, not for us to choose it for them.

In the end it all comes down to balance. These days, Will is a setter at the local gym in Fort Collins, and he and Mayah both climb for a regional team. While Cyn and I might feel that climbing and being outside are valuable, our kids might not always agree. Sometimes they want to try another sport or focus on school, and that, I believe, is the goal of good parenting: to have kids who are independent and thoughtful enough to seek out that which they need to be happy.

As a father of 3 young ones, this was really good for me to read. Balance and a healthy attitude on life is all I can hope to impart to my kids. Bravo to the author and his wife.

Family Values: Raising Kids Who Love to Climb

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The Saber in California's High Sierra

The Saber in California's High Sierra

'The Saber' became an idea and an obsession probably also equally as much because we came across this article & writeup from Sierra Mountain Guides that described the route and the area, and had us blown away.

' This ridge is the premiere attraction in the area at this point. That it was apparently not climbed before 2008 might be one of the eternal mysteries of the High Sierra. Nevertheless, it does live up to its beauty and reputation. It is a ridge traverse as much as a climb, in the style of Matthes Crest in Tuolumne, only better. The rock is of equal quality to Matthes, but the Sabre Ridge is longer, more dramatic, more committing, and with better climbing. In any case this climb is by anyone’s measure certain to be a 5-star classic.'

My favorite kind of trip report. Well done. I think I'm adding this to my 'to climb' list.

SABER RIDGE - obscure gem? or new classic in the California alpine

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The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time

The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time

A single principle lies at the heart of all these suggestions. When you’re engaged at work, fully engage, for defined periods of time. When you’re renewing, truly renew. Make waves. Stop living your life in the gray zone.

I am really, really, really bad at doing just one thing at a time. Conceptually I know that I could get more of my big reports/projects done if I focus on them and them only...but I can never seem to make myself do that.

Here's to another shot at productivity through focus!

The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time